The global market for advanced driver-assistance systems, or ADAS, may grow from $27 billion in 2020 to $83 billion in 2030 according to MarketsandMarkets. These systems are here to stay, so Florida drivers should know what the advantages and disadvantages are to installing or using them. To start with the positive, ADAS tech can reduce bodily injury claims and property damage claims by 27% and 19%, respectively.

The main feature of ADAS is the forward and rear collision warning; when combined with automatic emergency braking, it can alert drivers to a potential crash and apply the brakes in time if drivers cannot. Other features include blind-spot detection, which is beneficial when changing lanes; lane departure warning, which prevents lane drifting; and traffic-sign detection, which lets drivers know about speed limits, pedestrian crossings and more.

If all light-duty vehicle fleets were equipped with crash avoidance technology, these industries would save some $264 billion that would have otherwise gone to addressing accident-related losses. This was according to a researcher at Carnegie Mellon University. Professional drivers are recommended to have ADAS, but others may not need it.

The cons to ADAS includes the high cost of installing and repairing, various glitches and the lack of any insurance discounts attached to it. Drivers may also over-rely on ADAS and complacently distract themselves.

This is a particular danger that drivers need to avoid, especially since Florida considers texting while driving a primary, not secondary, offense. When phones or other distractions lead to car collisions, those who were injured may have a case against the other driver. A victim may be able to show that the other driver became inattentive precisely because of the vehicle safety features. Any injury case can be hard to argue against the insurance companies, though, so victims may want a lawyer to assist.